Older posts...
Older posts...
23 Sep
Designing APIs in a resource-oriented architecture
23 Sep 2014
Designing APIs in a resource-oriented architecture
28 Sep
How I'm going to land my dream job
28 Sep 2014
How I'm going to land my dream job
1 Oct
Neural net training fail
1 Oct 2014
Neural net training fail
13 Oct
Pow + SSL without the hassle
13 Oct 2014
Pow + SSL without the hassle
17 Oct
Using machine learning to rank search results (part 1)
17 Oct 2014
Using machine learning to rank search results (part 1)
23 Oct
Using machine learning to rank search results (part 2)
23 Oct 2014
Using machine learning to rank search results (part 2)
9 Nov
Managing complexity in Go
9 Nov 2014
Managing complexity in Go
25 Nov
Remote work: an engineering leader's perspective
25 Nov 2014
Remote work: an engineering leader's perspective
19 Sep
Running A/B tests on our hosting infrastructure
19 Sep 2016
Running A/B tests on our hosting infrastructure
27 Mar
Every service is an island
27 Mar 2017
Every service is an island

Dragonfly backed by ActiveRecord

If your app’s dynamic assets (user uploaded images for instance) weigh up to a few gigabytes, it can make sense to store them in the app’s database instead of another service (e.g. Amazon’s S3): your stack has one less dependency to care about, and backups get more complicated.

If you’re using the excellent dragonfly to manage and serve such assets, we’ve just released dragonfly-activerecord which lets you store assets to your app’s relational database.

It chunks and compresses files, is compatible with a variety of Rubies and databases, and is a drop-in replacements for Dragonfly’s default stores. It also plays nicely with Rack::Cache and/or a CDN for better performance.

This was reposted from HouseTrip’s developer blog.